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The Birth of Rocks Unit
Mystery 1 of 4
Could a volcano pop up where you live?
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Discuss:

Before we go any further, I’m curious to hear your ideas.
Do you think it’s possible for a volcano to pop up where you live? Why or why not?

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Discuss: This map shows the other volcanoes in the world. Are there any close to where you live?

volcanoesonworldmap

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Beginning Complete!

You've completed the Exploration & Activity!

If you have more time, view the assessment, reading, and extension activity in the optional extras.

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Optional Extras

Below are ideas for extending this topic beyond the activity & exploration you just completed.
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Volcano Resources

Here are some great resources for volcano research:

Here’s some information students might include in their reports:

  • Where is this volcano?
  • When did it last erupt?
  • What is most interesting about this volcano?
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Image & Video Credits

Mystery Science respects the intellectual property rights of the owners of visual assets. We make every effort to use images and videos under appropriate licenses from the owner or by reaching out to the owner to get explicit permission. If you are the owner of a visual and believe we are using it without permission, please contact us—we will reply promptly and make things right.

Lesson Image
Llaima eruption by Urbatem2 , used under CC BY-SA
city of Temuco by Claude Cobar , used under CC BY-SA
Exploration
lava flowing by HUGEFloods.com , used under CC BY
lava burning branches by News World , used under CC BY
Hawaii volcano lava by BigIslandHikes , used under CC BY
Roxbourne Park by Ewan Munro , used under CC BY-SA
stromboli by Steven W. Dengler , used under CC BY-SA
team of mules by unknown
ground cracks by Rémih
volcano fissure by activistpost , used under CC BY
Paricutin by K. Segerstrom, U.S. Geological Survey
lava flows by RBM
building on mountain by Fernando De la Torre , used under CC BY-SA
Mount Yasur by Eten over Zee , used under CC BY
Mt. St. Helens crater by R. P. Hoblitt
collecting lava by R.L. Christiansen
crater by MONUSCO Photos , used under CC BY-SA
lava sampling by USGS
Trimble Knob by Raph Levien , used under CC BY
Activity
ducks by Arne List , used under CC BY-SA
pencil by Charm
red pencil by Tom Ahearn
Other
split rocks by Rosino , used under CC BY
Overview
Grade 4th
Topic Rock Cycle & Earth's Processes
Focus Volcanoes, Rock Cycle & Earth's Surface
Print
Activity Prep

In this Mystery, students explore the past and present pattern of where volcanoes exist on the earth. In the activity, Mapping Volcanoes, students plot volcano locations on a world map and look for patterns. Students analyze these maps to discover that volcanoes form a “Ring of Fire” around the Pacific Ocean.

Preview activity

Number of students:
Colored Pencils
We suggest using red colored pencils or crayons because they are the color of volcano lava. Crayons also work.
Details
15 pencils
Volcano Discoveries printout Print 15 copies
Volcano Discoveries Answer Key printout Print 1 copy
Volcano Mapping printout Print 4 copies
Volcano Mapping Answer Key printout Print 1 copy

OPTIONAL SUPPLIES

Scotch Tape
To display completed Volcano Maps.
Details
1 roll
Prep Instructions

We suggest students work in pairs. Each pair of students will work on one quarter of the Volcano Map. At the end of the activity, four pairs of students will bring their maps together to form one complete Volcano Map.

Homeschool students can work on their own, but will need to complete all four parts of the Volcano Map so that they can analyze the global volcano pattern.

You will need enough wall space to display the completed maps. There will be one map for every 8 students, so a class of 32 students will have 4 completed maps. Each complete map measures approximately 22” x 17”.

Prepare Volcano Discoveries Printouts

Cut each Volcano Discoveries printout in half to make two worksheets. Each student needs a half sheet for the activity.

Display Maps (Optional)

At the end of the activity, you may want to display the completed Volcano Maps. Depending on the wall surface, attach the maps using tape or push pins.

Overview
Grade 4th
Topic Rock Cycle & Earth's Processes
Focus Volcanoes, Rock Cycle & Earth's Surface