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Weather Watching    Mystery 1

Mystery 1 image

In this Mystery students start their path toward becoming weather watchers! They learn the different factors involved in describing the weather, then observe and draw the weather.

Have you ever watched a storm?

Beginning Exploration (1 of 4)
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Beginning Exploration (2 of 4)
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Beginning Exploration (3 of 4)
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Beginning Exploration (4 of 4)

Describe this weather: Weather

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Beginning Activity Prep
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Complete!

You've completed the Exploration & Activity!

If you have more time, view the assessment, reading and extension activity in the optional extras.

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Optional Extras

Below are ideas for extending this topic beyond the activity & exploration you just completed.
  • End of Mystery Assessment : Open-ended drawing/writing prompt
  • Activity: With these Vocabulary Cards, students practice reading and writing skills while learning science vocabulary.
  • Read-Aloud: These books will get your students thinking & talking about weather.
  • Activity: Students can make a “Weather Window” that they use to record the weather each day for four days. Includes step-by-step instructions.
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Read-aloud books

Come On, Rain by Karen Hesse — A girl watches plants and people droop in a drought — then spring back to life when the rain falls. Questions for your students: Why did the girl want rain? How did she know that rain was coming? What happened when rain came?

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats (English & Spanish) — A boy experiments in the snow — making footprints, creating snow angels, and trying to save a snowball for the next day. Questions for your students: What do you think happened to the snowball that Peter put in his pocket? How would you save a snowball? Available as a video read aloud.

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Weather Window

This is an extra activity that we produced here at Mystery Science. It includes an activity video and step-by-step video instructions. See the Activity Prep below, then go to the next slide when you're ready to begin the video.

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Weather Window Activity Prep

Step 1: Think ahead.

Students will make a “Weather Window” that they will use to record the weather each day for four days.

Think about:

  • What time of day do you want students to check the weather? Ideally, it should be about the same time each day.
  • How many days do you want students to check the weather? The Weather Window has space to record weather for 4 days. If you want students to continue beyond 4 days, use the Weather Window handout without day numbers to add more days (see link below).

Step 2: Get supplies

Each student will need:

You may also need:

  • colored pencils or crayons (if you want students to color their handout)
  • glue (if you want students to glue the Weather Window in their science notebook)
  • additional Weather Windows with blank day numbers (if you want students to record the weather for more than 4 days)

Step 3: What’s next?

It’s fun watching the sky and tracking the weather. But your students probably won’t see dramatic changes in this short time. To make students aware of seasonal changes, we suggest they keep a four-day weather journal EACH SEASON. In other words, have students complete a Weather Window in fall, in winter, in spring, and in summer. They should note the season on each Weather Window and keep them in their science notebooks.

When they have completed all four seasons, compare the results in a class discussion. Look for patterns or trends in the weather where you live.

Beginning Activity Prep
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Image & Video Credits

Mystery Science respects the intellectual property rights of the owners of visual assets. We make every effort to use images and videos under appropriate licenses from the owner or by reaching out to the owner to get explicit permission. If you are the owner of a visual and believe we are using it without permission, please contact us—we will reply promptly and make things right.

Exploration
sunnny path in park by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Adam MeInyk
kid staring at the sky by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Zurijeta
morning storm by Ali A , used under CC BY
thunder audio clip by juskiddink , used under CC BY
elderly man on porch by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: All kind of people
lightning in the distance by Margaret Nissen
leaves blowing in the wind by Mike Seidel
boy shivering cold by Showface
severe thunderstorm by BikeGeedMTDX
clouds in the sky by epSos.de
cumulonimbus mushroom cloud by Sfortis
flag waving in the wind by M.D. Rusch , used under CC BY
boy looking at sky with binoculars by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Blacqbook
boy looking out at the sea by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: urbans
boy pointing at sky by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Michael Levy
boy with windmill by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: mimagephotography
little boy thinking by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Olena Zaskochenko
little boy pointing up by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Olena Zaskochenko
kid looking out the window by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Tomsickova Tatyana
boy riding a bike by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: AlexussK
hiker on a mountain by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Olga Danylenko
american flag by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Quang Ho
cumulus cloud by Phillip Halling , used under CC BY
little girl on a windy day by Image used under license from 123rf.com: Franck Boston
heavy rain by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: bikeriderlondon
snowy bench by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: Adam Gryko
sunny park by David Mark , used under Public Domain
Activity
view outside the window by Phillip Brewer
storm watching crew by Hokiestorm
hand pointing to the sky by Image used under license from Shutterstock.com: quingquing