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Weather Watching    Mystery 1

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Have you ever watched a storm?

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Describe this weather: Weather

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Note: This Mystery was updated on 8/2 with a significant revision to the activity. View the previous version.

Activity Prep

Step 1: Think ahead.

In this activity, your students will observe and draw a picture of today’s weather.

If possible, take your students for a walk and let them draw while they are outside. If that’s not possible, you’ll need a window that lets them observe the weather while drawing.

When students are drawing, you may need to remind them to pay attention the four aspects of the weather that are discussed in this mystery. We’ve included icons in the corner of the drawing sheet as a reminder.

Step 2: Get supplies.

Each student will need:

  • A drawing worksheet
  • Crayons or colored pencils
  • A clipboard if they will be drawing outside

Step 3: Optional follow up

Consider having students repeat this activity when the weather changes. Drawing gives them a tool that will help them pay attention to changes in the weather that they may otherwise overlook.

Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Note: This Mystery was updated on 8/2 with a significant revision to the activity. View the previous version.

Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Note: This Mystery was updated on 8/2 with a significant revision to the activity. View the previous version.

Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Optional Extras

Below are ideas for extending this topic beyond the activity & exploration you just completed.
  • Activity: With these Vocabulary Cards, students practice reading and writing skills while learning science vocabulary.
  • Read-Aloud: These books will get your students thinking & talking about weather.
  • Activity: Students can make a “Weather Window ” that they use to record the weather each day for four days. Includes step-by-step instructions.
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Read-aloud books

Come On, Rain by Karen Hesse — A girl watches plants and people droop in a drought — then spring back to life when the rain falls. Questions for your students: Why did the girl want rain? How did she know that rain was coming? What happened when rain came?

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats (English & Spanish) — A boy experiments in the snow — making footprints, creating snow angels, and trying to save a snowball for the next day. Questions for your students: What do you think happened to the snowball that Peter put in his pocket? How would you save a snowball? Available as a video read aloud.

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Weather Window

This is an extra activity that we produced here at Mystery Science. It includes an activity video and step-by-step video instructions. See the Activity Prep below, then go to the next slide when you're ready to begin the video.

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Weather Window Activity Prep

Step 1: Think ahead.

Students will make a “Weather Window” that they will use to record the weather each day for four days.

Think about:

  • What time of day do you want students to check the weather? Ideally, it should be about the same time each day.
  • How many days do you want students to check the weather? The Weather Window has space to record weather for 4 days. If you want students to continue beyond 4 days, use the Weather Window handout without day numbers to add more days (see link below).

Step 2: Get supplies

Each student will need:

You may also need:

  • colored pencils or crayons (if you want students want to color their handout)
  • glue (if you want students to glue the Weather Window in their science notebook)
  • additional Weather Windows with blank day numbers (if you want students to record the weather for more than 4 days)

Step 3: What’s next?

It’s fun watching the sky and tracking the weather. But your students probably won’t see dramatic changes in this short time. To make students aware of seasonal changes, we suggest they keep a four-day weather journal EACH SEASON. In other words, have students complete a Weather Window in fall, in winter, in spring, and in summer. They should note the season on each Weather Window and keep them in their science notebooks.

When they have completed all four seasons, compare the results in a class discussion. Look for patterns or trends in the weather where you live.

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Weather Window Activity Prep

Step 1: Think ahead.

Students will make a “Weather Window” that they will use to record the weather each day for four days.

Think about:

  • What time of day do you want students to check the weather? Ideally, it should be about the same time each day.
  • How many days do you want students to check the weather? The Weather Window has space to record weather for 4 days. If you want students to continue beyond 4 days, use the Weather Window handout without day numbers to add more days (see link below).

Step 2: Get supplies

Each student will need:

You may also need:

  • colored pencils or crayons (if you want students want to color their handout)
  • glue (if you want students to glue the Weather Window in their science notebook)
  • additional Weather Windows with blank day numbers (if you want students to record the weather for more than 4 days)

Step 3: What’s next?

It’s fun watching the sky and tracking the weather. But your students probably won’t see dramatic changes in this short time. To make students aware of seasonal changes, we suggest they keep a four-day weather journal EACH SEASON. In other words, have students complete a Weather Window in fall, in winter, in spring, and in summer. They should note the season on each Weather Window and keep them in their science notebooks.

When they have completed all four seasons, compare the results in a class discussion. Look for patterns or trends in the weather where you live.

Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Beginning Activity: Be a Weather Watcher
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Image & Video Credits

Mystery Science respects the intellectual property rights of the owners of visual assets. We make every effort to use images and videos under appropriate licenses from the owner or by reaching out to the owner to get explicit permission. If you are the owner of a visual and believe we are using it without permission, please contact us—we will reply promptly and make things right.

Exploration
morning storm by Ali A , used under CC BY
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