How can you knock down the most bowling pins?
Read-Along Lesson 4 image
How can you knock down the most bowling pins?
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Optional Activity: Human Bumper Bowling

In this game, students work together to knock down the bowling pins. The next slide provides details on how to play.
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Optional Activity: Human Bumper Bowling

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  1. Form groups of four to six.
  2. Assign roles. Each group needs one person to be the Roller and one person to be the Catcher. Everyone else is a Bumper. Decide who will take the first turn in each role.
  3. Get supplies. Roller gets a ball. Each Bumper gets a hardcover book. Bumpers use their books to bump the ball when it’s about to roll out of the alley. They also keep the ball moving down the alley so it can knock down the pins.
  4. The goal of Human Bumper Bowling is to knock down the pins with lots of bumps along the way.
  5. Let each Roller have two turns, then move in a circle to switch roles so everyone gets a turn as Roller.
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Extensions

Below is an idea for extending this topic beyond the activity & exploration you just completed.
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Activity: Play Balloon Bounce

This requires some upfront prep but it’s worth it! You’ll need some inflated balloons and a homemade “paddle” for each player. To make a paddle, you’ll need a paper plate, some masking tape, and a “handle,” — a big craft stick, a paint stirrer, or even a sturdy plastic fork.

  • Tape the handle to the back of the plate and write the player’s name on the plate.
  • Tell the students that there’s one rule. Only the teacher can touch the balloon with their hands. Everyone else can only touch it with the paddle. If it’s on the floor, scoop it up with the paddle.
  • Give the players a challenge that’s appropriate to their skill level and your classroom space. Here are some possibilities: Roll the balloon, passing it from player to player. Use your paddle like a croquet mallet.
    Have a relay race where students walk across the room, balancing a balloon on their plate, then bounce it to another student, who carries it back. Let students figure out ways to make the transfer. Don’t let the balloon touch the floor. Bounce it up in the air with your paddle. Invent your own games. Balloon Tennis! Balloon Racquetball!
  • Don’t forget to remind your students that these games are all about forces and how hard you hit the balloon!
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Lesson narration:
Print Prep
Activity Prep

Switch to non-narrated version

In this Read-Along lesson, Daniel worries he won’t do well at a friend’s Bumper Bowling party…until he figures out an unexpected way to win. The lesson includes a short exercise where students act out bowling. If you want to extend the lesson, you can try this optional activity, Human Bumper Bowling, where students make a model bumper bowling alley and work together to knock down pins.

Preview optional activity

COVID-19 Adaptations
See our advice below

Students at home
We suggest you assign Balloon Bounce to your students. Send home a balloon and a paper plate paddle with each student. Students will need a partner to help inflate their balloon and play the game.
Students at school
We suggest you play Balloon Bounce with your students. You will need to inflate balloons and provide a paper plate paddle for your students. Play the game with each student at a safe distance from one another.
Number of students:
Hardcover Books
2 books per group
Yardstick or Meterstick
1 stick per class
Masking Tape
25 feet per group
Solo Cups (9 oz)
6 cups per group
Tennis Balls
1 ball per group
Prep Instructions

We suggest having students work in groups of four to six.

This activity requires enough floor space to set up “bowling alleys.” Decide how many you’ll set up and where you’ll put them. Using masking tape, mark off alleys that are 10 feet long and 2½ feet wide. Mark a box at the end to set the pins in. Leave room between your bowling alleys for students to sit on the floor.

Bowling Set Up

Extensions
Download this Lesson to your device so you can play it offline: