How do scientists know so much?
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DISCUSS:

What do these two stories have in common? (What did both scientists do that was similar?)

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Optional Extra: Curiosity Wheel

Below is an idea for extending this activity throughout the school year by using our Curiosity Wheel .

 

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Activity Prep

In this mini-lesson, students deepen their understanding of two foundational scientific practices: making observations and asking questions. In the activity, Curiosity Challenge, students “train their brains” by observing an everyday object and asking questions like a scientist would.

Preview activity

Number of students:
2-5 Wonder Journal printout Print 30 copies
K-1 Curiosity Question printout Print 30 copies
K-1 Wonder Journal printout Print 30 copies
Prep Instructions

We suggest students work in pairs. Homeschool students can work on their own.

This activity can be repeated throughout the year with any object to help focus student observations, spark curiosity, and invite questions for deeper understanding!

Interested in extending this lesson? Check out our "Curiosity Wheel" in the Optional Extras to extend this activity throughout the school year!

Download this Mystery to your device so you can play it offline: