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How do you know what to wear for the weather?

How do you know what to wear for the weather?

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Optional Activity: Wind & Weather

You can tell if the wind is blowing just by looking out the window — if you know what to look for.

1) Listen to the poem “Who Has Seen the Wind?” as your teacher reads it out loud.

2) Observe and discuss: “Can you see the wind? Look out the window and tell me if it’s windy. How do you know?”

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3) Here are some things that tell us that the wind is blowing.

  • A flapping flag
  • Fluttering leaves
  • Dead leaves or dust blowing across the ground

4) Think about what it's like to be a tree in the wind. Stand up and pretend to be:

  • a tree on a calm day
  • a tree when the wind is blowing gently
  • a tree when the wind is blowing really hard

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Extensions

Below is an idea for extending this topic beyond the activity & exploration you just completed.

  • Lesson Assessment : Open-ended drawing prompt
  • Two hundred years ago, a British Navy officer named Francis Beaufort made observations that told him how fast the wind was blowing. His observations became the Beaufort Scale. People still sometimes use the Beaufort Scale to estimate wind speed. You and your students can use this to estimate how fast the wind is blowing today.
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Activity Prep

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In this Read-Along lesson, Kevin becomes a weather detective to figure out why he keeps losing his warm clothes. The lessons includes a short exercise where students observe the weather and compare it to what they remember from earlier in the day. You can extend the lesson with the optional activity, Wind and Weather, in which students use poetry and observation to start noticing which way the wind is blowing, an important factor in how weather changes over time.

Preview optional activity
COVID-19 Adaptations
Students can work solo
No supplies needed

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