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Human Machine    Mystery 2

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What do people who are blind see?

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Beginning Exploration (1 of 6)
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Beginning Exploration (2 of 6)

DISCUSS (1 of 3):

Why do you think some people have problems with vision?

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Beginning Exploration (3 of 6)

DISCUSS (2 of 3):

How could we figure out how eyes work?

Here’s what we came up with...

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Beginning Exploration (4 of 6)

DISCUSS (3 of 3): Look at these eyes, and the eyes of the person next to you. What's the same? What's different?

Eyes Comparison

Do you think that any of the differences could explain why some people have trouble with vision, or not?

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Beginning Exploration (5 of 6)
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Beginning Activity Prep
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Beginning Activity: Eye Model
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Beginning Exploration (6 of 6)
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Optional Extras

Below are ideas for extending this topic beyond the activity & exploration you just completed.
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Readings:

These Common-Core-aligned readings are free with registration on ReadWorks. All readings include comprehension questions.

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Discussion

Why does a lens make an image appear upside-down?

The lenses in your eyes are known as “convex” lenses: they’re curved outward. As light rays enter the far edges of a convex lens, the light rays are bent inwards. In other words, light rays entering the top of the lens bend down toward the bottom of the retina, and light rays coming in from the bottom of the lens bend toward the top of the retina. This is why the image looks upside-down! (You might wonder: Why don’t we see everything upside-down? That is a question which puzzled scientists… learn more!

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Discussion with Video

Why don't we see everything upside-down?

Light makes an upside-down picture on the retina of your model eye. The picture on the retina of your real eye is also upside down. So why don’t you see everything upside-down? Ask your students if they can think of an experiment that might answer this question.

Here's an experiment some scientists tried. They had someone wear eyeglasses that flipped the picture in their eyes so it was right-side-up. To find out what happened, watch this video.

It turns out that the answer is not in your eyes -- but in your brain. Your brain learns to make sense of the picture in your eyes -- whether it's right-side-up or upside-down.

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Image & Video Credits

Mystery Science respects the intellectual property rights of the owners of visual assets. We make every effort to use images and videos under appropriate licenses from the owner or by reaching out to the owner to get explicit permission. If you are the owner of a visual and believe we are using it without permission, please contact us—we will reply promptly and make things right.

Exploration
blind man by TommyEdisonXP , used under CC BY
cat in window by Chris Lattuada , used under CC BY / Heavily modified
glasses by Michelle Arseneault , used under CC BY-SA / Adjusted color, cropped
cow by Peggy Greb
Activity
race car by The Tire Zoo , used under CC BY
light switch by Derek Gavey , used under CC BY-SA
man standing in front of curtains by Maegan Tintari , used under CC BY-SA
Other
Unit: brown eye by Giulia Marotta , used under Public Domain