Why do some things explode?

Why do some things explode?

Lesson narration:
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DISCUSS:

What makes these things explode? What’s going on?

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DISCUSS:

Why do you think the containers were shattering?

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DISCUSS:

On the back of your worksheet, draw a picture using a particle model to explain why the bag exploded. (Or you can label or add to the picture you drew earlier.)

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Anchor Connection

DISCUSS (1 of 2) :

Look at the "Wonder" column of your class See-Think-Wonder chart. Have any questions been answered by this Mystery?

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Anchor Connection

DISCUSS (2 of 2) :

When the acid rain and the gargoyle react, what new substances might be produced? Where would they go? Go to the next slide and fill in your evidence chart.

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Extensions

Below are ideas for extending this topic beyond the activity & exploration which you just completed.
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Readings

These readings will get students thinking about the gases that are all around us.

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Activity: Inflate a balloon

Follow these instructions, to fill a balloon with carbon dioxide, the same gas that filled your plastic bag. Try the experiment, and then:

  • Draw a picture that shows what makes the balloon inflate.
  • Predict what will happen if you pinch the neck of the inflated balloon, take it off the bottle, then let it go. Draw a picture that shows what’s happens when you do that — and why it happens.

If you have time, experiment to figure out what ratio of baking soda to vinegar produces the most gas (and the biggest balloon).

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Discussion: Bread bubbles (part 1)

Look at the holes in this slice of banana bread. Each hole was made by a bubble that formed while the bread was baking. Those bubbles made the bread rise. bananabread

Go to the next slide to discuss where those bubbles came from.

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Discussion: Bread bubbles (part 2)

Here are the ingredients used to make banana bread:

  • vinegar
  • milk
  • butter
  • sugar
  • bananas
  • flour
  • baking soda
  • walnuts
  • eggs
  • Discuss:

    • Why do you think bubbles formed in the batter?
    • What do you think would happen if you left out the vinegar?

    See previous slide for a view of the holes in banana bread. See next slide for more about the bubbles in bread.

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    Discussion: Bread bubbles (part 3)

    Any bread or cake that rises as it bakes has bubbles in the batter. Take a look at some bread recipes. Can you figure out which ingredients make bubbles in each recipe?

    If you need help, check out this extensive discussion of leavening agents. (A leavening agent is a substance that produces gas to make bubbles in a batter.)

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    Lesson narration:

    Activity Prep

    Print Prep

    In this lesson, students investigate and model how gases cause explosions. In the activity, Bag of Bubbles, students experiment by combining baking soda and vinegar inside a sealed bag and observe how the gas bubbles produced cause the bag to inflate–and sometimes pop!

    Preview activity
    COVID-19 Adaptations
    Digital worksheets available
    Teacher demo recommended

    Students at home
    Set up the first part of the activity and have students make observations as you demonstrate Steps 1 - 13 over video conference. Students need the Capturing Chaos worksheet (printed or digital) to record their observations.
    Students at school
    Set up the first part of the activity and have students make observations as you demonstrate Steps 1 - 13. Each student needs a Capturing Chaos worksheet to record their observations.

    Exploration

    11 mins

    Wrap-Up

    4 mins

    Extend this lesson

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