Open-and-go lessons that inspire kids to love science.

Science curriculum for K—5th grades.

90 sec
  • Hands-on — lead students in the doing of science and engineering.
  • Standards-aligned science lessons — Cover core standards in 1-2 hours of science per week.
  • Less prep, more learning — prep in minutes not hours. Captivate your students with short videos and discussion questions.

Sign up now to try Mystery Science for free.

Sign up

Open-and-go lessons that inspire kids to love science.

Sign up now for tons of free lessons like this one!

Mini-lessons

Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Slide Image
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Slide Image
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Slide Image
This kind of looks like a nose, but it isn’t a nose! An animal does use these holes to breathe though. What animal do you think it is?
5
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
It’s a whale--and this is a blowhole. It's like a nose, but it's on the whale's back! Whales use it to breathe above water.
5
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Slide Image
Whales hold their breath for about an hour to swim. How long do you think these animals can hold their breath for? Why?
4
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Gannet birds dive underwater to catch fish! They hold their breath for about a minute. Watch them swim with their wings!
4
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
This is a special type of iguana, a marine iguana. It holds its breath for about 30 minutes while it eats underwater plants!
4
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Elephants go swimming too, but they don’t need to hold their breath. They just stick their trunks above the water to breathe!
4
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Slide Image
Caterpillars don’t breathe through their mouths or noses… so how do they breathe? How does air get in their body? Take a guess.
3
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Caterpillars use tiny holes in the sides of their bodies to breathe! The holes open and close to let in air. (They’re called spiracles.)
3
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
This caterpillar is see-through--you can look inside of it as it breathes! Air goes in the tiny holes and travels through tubes!
3
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Frogs can breathe through their nostrils. But they also sometimes fill up their “cheeks” with air. Why? Take a guess.
2
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
It’s to help them make loud sounds! Different types of frogs use their air sacs to make different sounds!
2
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
People can blow bubbles underwater using the air in their lungs. Which animals do you think can blow bubbles?
1
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
This dog learned how! The air from its lungs “shoots” into the water as it breathes out, making the water jump up & bubble.
1
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Beluga whales are amazing bubble makers. They can use their mouths AND blowholes to make ring-shaped bubbles!
1
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Slide Image
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen
Full Screen
Controls Icon Exit Full Screen

Voting for this episode is now closed. Would you like to vote on the most recent poll?

I pulled three questions from my jar. Which question do you want to explore next week?

  • Why do lightbulbs get hot?

    -Lyric, 3rd Grade

  • How are pianos made?

    -Vivian, 1st Grade

  • How high can birds fly?

    -Nova, 2nd Grade

Why do we need blood?

Watch the video to discover the answer and don't forget to vote for next week's question. There are mysteries all around us. Have fun and stay curious!