Open-and-go lessons that inspire kids to love science.

Science curriculum for K—5th grades.

90 sec
  • Hands-on lead students in the doing of science and engineering.
  • Standards-aligned science lessons Cover core standards in 1-2 hours of science per week.
  • Less prep, more learning prep in minutes not hours. Captivate your students with short videos and discussion questions.

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Open-and-go lessons that inspire kids to love science.

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What would happen if you pushed these keys on a phone’s keypad? (Hint: This is way too long to be a phone number!)
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Each key makes a different sound. If the keys are pushed in this order, the phone plays a famous song called "Frère Jacques."
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One musician discovered that the keys on old calculators also make musical sounds—and they played something amazing!
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Sometimes angry people honk their car horns. What an annoying sound! Can you think of a way to make that noise into music?
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When you lock a car by pushing a button on the key, the horn honks. These guys used that to play a song.
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Cars aren’t the only vehicles with horns. The captains of these cruise ships teamed up to slowly play “Happy Birthday"!
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People play harps by plucking the strings with their fingers, like this. But no one is playing this harp. Why is it making sounds?
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Notice the grass and leaves moving in the wind. The wind moves the strings of the harp, too, making the sound you hear!
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When wind blows, parts of this bridge move, just like the strings of the harp. That makes a strange humming sound.
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Close your eyes and listen. Some people are playing a song by hitting things with hammers. What do you think they are hitting?
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These special rocks ring like bells when hit. These people found rocks that make the sounds in "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star."
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For thousands of years, the Raglai people of Vietnam have been using ringing rocks to make musical instruments like this one.
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Suppose someone gave you a pile of plastic tubes and asked you to make music with them. What would you do?
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Here’s one way to do it! Short tubes make high sounds; long tubes make low sounds. Listen for the high and low sounds in the songs!
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Voting for this episode is now closed. Would you like to vote on the most recent poll?

I pulled three questions from my jar. Which question do you want to explore next week?

  • Why do people blink?

    -Albiona, 4th Grade

  • Can animals really predict the weather?

    -Renatta, 2nd Grade

  • What is tape made of?

    -Eston, 1st Grade

How do phones work?

Watch the video to discover the answer and don't forget to vote for next week's question. There are mysteries all around us. Have fun and stay curious!