Open-and-go lessons that inspire kids to love science.

Science curriculum for K—5th grades.

90 sec
  • Hands-on — lead students in the doing of science and engineering.
  • NGSS-aligned and Common Core — make the transition to the Next Generation Science Standards and support Common Core.
  • Less prep, more learning — prep in minutes not hours. Captivate your students with short videos and discussion questions.

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Open-and-go lessons that inspire kids to love science.

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Whoa, check this out! This creature is a type of armadillo.
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Why do you think it has those scales on its back?!
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Some armadillos curl up into a ball to defend themselves. Those scales act like a shield!
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This is called a tarsier. It’s a primate, the same family that includes monkeys.
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Why do you think its eyes are so big?!
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Tarsiers are nocturnal—they only come out at night. Bigger eyes help them see better in the dark!
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Believe it or not, this is real! This is called a star-nosed mole.
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The star-nosed mole has these strange tentacles on its snout. What do you think it uses them for?
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Moles live underground and have poor eyesight. This mole uses these to feel around in the dark!
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Scientists keep discovering new animals in the deep sea. This one we discovered a few years ago!
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Some people call it the “headless chicken fish”— but it’s not actually a fish. Can you guess what it is?
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It’s actually a type of animal called a sea cucumber. They’re related to sea stars (starfish)!
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Here’s another one discovered recently on a deep sea dive. Can you guess its name?
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It’s called the blobfish! They live at depths of 1 km (½ mile) along the bottom of the ocean.
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Voting for this episode is now closed. Would you like to vote on the most recent poll?

I pulled three questions from my jar. Which question do you want to explore next week?

  • Do sharks really want to eat people?

    -Melody, 4th grade

  • How are bowling balls made?

    -Presley, 2nd Grade

  • Why don’t erasers work on pens?

    -Zairah, 3rd Grade

Were dragons ever real?

Watch the video to discover the answer and don't forget to vote for next week's question. There are mysteries all around us. Have fun and stay curious!