Open-and-go lessons that inspire kids to love science.

Science curriculum for K—5th grades.

90 sec
  • Hands-on — lead students in the doing of science and engineering.
  • Standards-aligned science lessons — Cover core standards in 1-2 hours of science per week.
  • Less prep, more learning — prep in minutes not hours. Captivate your students with short videos and discussion questions.

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Open-and-go lessons that inspire kids to love science.

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Flamingos are a famous pink animal. How many other pink animals can you think of? (There aren’t too many famous ones!)
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Maybe you thought of pigs or worms. Here are some pink animals we think should be famous: these pink toads and this pink lobster!
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You know that dogs (and cats) can be different colors—though not pink. But a different, unusual pet can be pink…
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Boa constrictor snakes are usually brown and black. But rarely, they’re born with different colors! Look at these colorful pet boas!
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Most praying mantises are green. Being green helps them hide in green plants. (This is called camouflage.) But...
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...this praying mantis isn’t green! It can’t hide in green leaves! How could being pink help this praying mantis? Any ideas?
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Pink praying mantises look like a type of pink flower! Pretending to be a flower helps it catch bugs to eat!
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A few years ago, a person in Louisiana (USA) spotted this pink animal swimming in the water. Can you tell what it is?
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It’s a dolphin—an albino dolphin, which means its body can’t make dark colors (like gray). Instead, albino animals are white or pink!
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Check out this pink underwater coral. If we look at it up close (on the next slide), we might see something pink hiding in it…
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Here’s the animal moving. You may be able to see its eyes. Can you guess what it is yet? You’ll get a clue on the next slide.
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Here’s what their whole body looks like! Can you tell what it is now? (Hint: think of another underwater animal that is this shape.)
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It’s a type of seahorse—the tiniest kind in the world, no bigger than your fingernail. They live their whole lives hiding in the coral!
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I pulled three questions from my jar. Which question do you want to explore next week?

  • Can my pet understand what I'm saying?

    -Zen, 5th Grade

  • What do AM and PM stand for?

    -Sidhra, 3rd Grade

  • Who invented pillows?

    -Maryam, 4th Grade

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